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Publication date: Jun. 21, 2006

HURRICANE RESOURCES TO BOOKMARK

As hurricanes begin to line up off U.S., Caribbean, and Mexican shores, journalists on the front lines will be scrambling to find information. Some new tools may help you develop a new angle: how the storm will change the coastline.

Of course, the best all-around starting point for breaking information is the National Weather Service's National Hurricane Center, where you can find many of the basics about a current storm. Media contacts.

For more detail on any Category 3 or higher hurricane in the Gulf or Southeast, check out this US Geological Survey site; Ann Tihansky, 727-803-8747 x3075. The current hurricane will be listed near the top of the column on the left, and new information will be highlighted elsewhere on the page (incidentally, Alberto didn't make the list because it fell below Category 3).

One or two days before landfall, officials expect to add an assessment of how the storm will change the coast. One or two days after landfall, they will post before and after photographs of the affected coast. Three weeks to a month after landfall, they will post selected information on topographic changes to affected beaches and sand dunes.

You may be able to supplement your pre- and post-landfall stories with additional coastal details available here and here.

In addition to damage to the coast itself, severe flooding often occurs inland. Check out real-time streamflow information.

EPA provides guides that may help your audience prepare before and respond after a hurricane, written in English and Spanish.


Last revised January 22, 2013

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